Book Reviews

Book Review: Ruined Days by Guinotte Wise

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Title: Ruined Days Author: Guinotte Wise Genre: action/thriller Publisher: Black Opal Books Release Date: December 19, 2015 Format: ebook Pages: 253 Ruined Days by Guinotte Wise takes the conspiracy theory paranoia surrounding the assassination of John F. Kenneday and drives it to a whole new level. I made the mistake of starting this book at 11PM and was immediately sucked in and stayed up half the night reading it. Ruined Days’ protagonist is Travis Meachem, a soldier of fortune, and his stable of crazy rednecks who whirl through the...

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Book Reviews: A Canticle for Leibowitz, Haw, and Dustlands

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Book Reviews: A Canticle for Leibowitz, Haw, and Dustlands

Title: A Canticle for Leibowitz, Haw, and Dustlands Author: Walter M. Miller, Jr., Sean Jackson, Moira Young Genre: Post-apocalyptic books The first post-apocalyptic book I read was A Canticle for Leibowitz byWalter M. Miller, Jr. Though originally published in 1960, I read it ten years later when I started college. Set in a Catholic monastery in the southwestern United States, Leibowitz spans millennia and documents mankind’s efforts to rebuild civilization after twentieth century civilization is destroyed by a global nuclear war,...

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Book Review: All This Life by Joshua Mohr

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Book Review: All This Life by Joshua Mohr

Book Review: All This Life by Joshua Mohr Having read all of Mohr’s books, this is definitely my favorite, a five star read, for sure. As someone who kept a bust of Albert Einstein on my desk in college, I was hooked by the first line of Joshua Mohr’s All This Life with it’s rephrasing of Einstein’s famous equation into E = mc despaired. Mohr does a wonderful job capturing life in San Francisco. What follows is a story that is darkly cynical, yet jauntily humorous, as well as an anthropological dissection of our lives and social media....

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Book Review: Hidden Shadows by Linda Lucretia Shuler

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Book Review: Hidden Shadows by Linda Lucretia Shuler

In Hidden Shadows, by Linda Lucretia Shuler, widow Cassandra Brighton moves to her grandmother’s ancestral home in the Texas Hill Country to fulfill a deathbed promise to live there a year. Cassie explores the landscape of Texas as well as her grandmother’s house. She meets her elderly neighbors and gradually comes to love the folks in her small Texas community, develops a romantic interest in the artist Hawk and a respect and love for his idiosyncratic mother, Tatty. Cassie’s new home is not just filled with clutter. Ghosts, good and bad,...

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Book Review: The Second Chances of Priam Wood by Alexander Rigby

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Book Review: The Second Chances of Priam Wood by Alexander Rigby

Book Review: The Second Chances of Priam Wood by Alexander Rigby Priam Wood is an elderly man, dying of pancreatic cancer. When given the opportunity to relive seven days of his life, his choices change the course of his life. I am roughly the age of the protagonist, Priam, at the end of this book. Thus I can relate to the loss of loved ones and the desire to do things differently, to be a different person. The book provoked me to question which seven of my own days I would redo if I could. Though Alexander Rigby tackles big issues in this...

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Book Review: Intended for Harm by C. S. Lakin

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Book Review: Intended for Harm by C. S. Lakin

 Intended for Harm by C.S. Lakin covers the life of Jake Abrams over a period of forty years. While the writing is eloquent and expressive, the book is not without its flaws. The first part deals with Jake’s marriage to Leah, a woman prone to depression and who loves being pregnant more than caring for her children. After Leah abandons her husband and four children, Jake marries Rachel and has another two children. During this second portion of the book, the Biblical overtones become a bit heavy-handed, even understanding that the novel...

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Book Review: Purgatorium (Books 1-3 Boxed Set) by Eva Pohler

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Book Review: Purgatorium (Books 1-3 Boxed Set) by Eva Pohler

Book Review: Purgatorium (Books 1-3 Boxed Set) by Eva Pohler  The Purgatorium series by Eva Pohler is a high-thrills, suspense-packed boxed set with a plot rampant with twists and turns. Ms. Pohler develops the setting well, creating a history of a Pacific Coast island and combining it with the geography of the region and Native American mythology. Dr. Gray and her psychiatrist cohorts represented modern medicine taken to an extreme, and I wondered if the end results of their “living art” justified their over-the-top means. The series is...

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Book Review: The Fruit of the Fallen by J. C. Burnham

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Book Review:  The Fruit of the Fallen by J. C. Burnham

Book Review:  The Fruit of the Fallen by J. C. Burnham A dying nun thrusts a baby into the arms of Dr. Jonathan Keats. His life alters dramatically from that point. All he know is that the child’s name is Serenity, and she must be protected at all costs. His quest for answers leads him to Europe where he discovers intrigue within the Vatican involving an ancient secret religious faction. A story laced with prophecies, angels, demons, hellhounds, The Fruit of the Fallen pulls motifs from Christian theology and mixes it with murder and...

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Book Review: Jonesbridge: Echoes of Hinterland by M. E. Parker

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Book Review: Jonesbridge: Echoes of Hinterland by M. E. Parker

Book Review:  Jonesbridge: Echoes of Hinterland by M. E. Parker From the intensely chilling opening scene of torture combined with brain-washing, Parker builds a unique dystopic world. A “patriotic slave” like many more of Jonesbridge’s residents, Myron works as a slog in the Jonesbridge Industrial Complex. Like prisoners of war, they are fed just enough to keep them functioning. Women are sterilized. Slogs are worked to death, recycling anything they can to fuel a never-ending war against the Eastern Bloc, a holdover from the Zealot War in...

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Book Review: Woman, Woman by Angela de Hoyos

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Book Review: Woman, Woman by Angela de Hoyos

Book Review: Woman, Woman by Angela de Hoyos Woman, Woman by Angela de Hoyos is a brief book filled with startlingly beautiful poetry, meant to be savored. Understated, ironic, humorous, very personal work. People with no knowledge of Spanish might have some difficulty with a couple of the poems. I don’t think there was a poem I didn’t like, but several I adored, especially “Up to a Certain Point” appealed to me as an artist and author. When I know my sky to be blue and your brush insists on painting it purple…...

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