VERONICA’S GRAVE: A DAUGHTER’S MEMOIR by Barbara Kracht Donsky

Veronica's Grave: A Daughter's Memoir Book Cover Veronica's Grave: A Daughter's Memoir
Barbara Kracht Donsky
Memoir
She Writes Press
May 10, 2016
Kindle, paperback Audible
338
Amazon

WINNER OF SILVER AWARD FOR BEST MEMOIR 2016 READERS' FAVORITE 

2016 BEVERLY HILLS BOOK AWARDS FINALIST FOR MEMOIR

From beyond the grave came a cry for help she could not ignore. Reminiscent in style to Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird and to Betty Smith's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Veronica's Grave is the story of a young girl whose mother vanishes one night. No one tells her that  her mother has died. She is left a confused child whose father is intent upon erasing any memory of the mother. Forced to keep the secret of their mother's existence from her younger brother, Eddie, Barbara struggles to keep from being crushed under the weight of family secrets as she comes of age and tries to educate herself, despite her father's stance against women's education.

A story of loss and resilience, Veronica's Grave shows the power of literature―from Orphan Annie and  Prince Valiant to the incomparable Nancy Drew―to offer hope where there is little. This is a story--painful too remember, too important to forget-- that will make you laugh, make you cry, and linger on in the left-side brain for many a year.

Told with true literary sensibility, this captivating memoir asks us to consider what it is that parents owe their children, and how far a child need go to make things right for her family.

Author Barbara Kracht Donsky transcends the expected pathos when she writes of the loss of the loss of her mother in VERONICA’S GRAVE: A DAUGHTER’S MEMOIR. When Donsky was only three, her mother dies. The death is never explained. The child only knows her vibrant mother is missing from her life. Her father is distant and somewhat cold. Donsky does a superb job in capturing the voice of a bewildered young girl who doesn’t understand how the most important person in her life has vanished. As Donsky learns the truth, she then conspires with her family to keep her mother’s death from her younger brother. The voice matures as Donsky grows into a young then a married woman. As a woman not so far in age from Ms. Donsky, I enjoyed the cultural references and celebrated her escape from her father, her resilience, and her ability to forge her own life at a time when such steps were difficult for young women.

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